Building a family

To the family of Frank Balen & Greta Tvys Balen

Where to begin? I could talk today about all the things my father taught me –how to clean a fish, paddle a canoe, find the best blueberry patch.

I could recount memories of my father’s kindness and generosity–the morning calls he made from work to me at university to check in with me, OR the countless hours walking the Sunsite estate deck with 6-week old Paul, then Mikaela, then Geordie on his shoulder. Or volunteering to be my driver for weeks of radiation treatment I needed in Sudbury.

But I’m not.

Instead, I want to talk about this event —this celebration of life as the celebration of family because when I think of Frank– I think of Greta. And when I think of Greta, I think of Frank. And what I think about is the work they did together to build a family.

Where I work I am constantly faced with questions about identity, belonging, truth, and reconciliation. My students’ struggle to find their place, to make sense of what it means to be Anishinabe in the 21st century—to simultaneously be able to cheer on the Raptors and to turn their backs on Canada 150. And their struggle is causing many of us to wonder about our own sense of identity.

Nation building is hard work. It’s hard work because our differences push at us, demanding our attention when what we need to do is respond to the pull of our shared values. And we need to trust that others will do the same.

I remember my mom telling me about a time when a colleague of hers threatened to make a play for Frank. Mom, pregnant at the time, told her “go ahead if you can get him, he was never mine. But you won’t get him.”

Along with their love and profound trust in each other, our parents shared a progressive perspective.

Remember mom working through pregnancies and staying in the workforce afterwards; changing careers mid-life. I recall the day she told us that she had received her real estate license…dad’s face beaming with happiness for her.

Remember mom and dad living and working apart in 1976 long before it became common practice: mom, David and I living in Hull and Dad in Mattagami.

Remember, dad embracing 21st-century communication in his 80s learning how to use a tablet and then connecting virtually with many of you at Mike’s funeral.

They were so modern.

We can wonder why they were so progressive. It could be because of the times, their upbringing and education. But I think it might have more to do with their desire to belong in this new country. Frank and Greta never turned their backs on their past—traditions like colouring easter eggs and hosting lamb barbecues and in particular serving foods like palacinke, pierogi, cabbage rolls, kapusta, and kugelis lived on in their home. But, there were no trips back to the old country, no tamburica lessons and dad refused to teach me how to speak Croatian.

We were Canadian. We had a camp. We fished and hunted. We went to Expo….Ca-na-da 1 little, 2 little, 3 Canadians. We love thee. Now we are twenty million. 

And mom and dad did love Canada–from the rocky Cambrian shield to the red bluffs of PEI. I suppose there were times when we rocketed to our destinations, but what I remember most is mom calling out, “Antique shop just ahead, the sign says 10 miles”. We’d groan. Or dad announcing, “Ice cream in 5 miles! Anyone interested?”

Mom loved antiques—Canadiana in particular. Pine tables, press back chairs, hurricane lamps. When you’re not from the place you’re in, you have to construct your past. Surrounding themselves with antiques is one way to say we belong.

But there were others. Everywhere they lived, mom and dad purchased art by local artists. Paintings and quill boxes. Dad continued this custom most recently purchasing two Norval Morriseau prints. I remember how proud and excited he was to add them to his collection.

Image of “Sermon to the birds” from bearclaw gallery

I believe that mom and dad worked intentionally to build a narrative for us: a past, present, and future. To ground that story in this place—you belong here.

This land is my land. This land is your land.

There is no family home to pass on; no legacy other than the story they created together. And what a story it is.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under Teaching

Dignity

I’ve done lots of work with students on the topic of dignity over the years. In 2013, my classes participated in Global Dignity Day for the first time. We learned about dignity and created products like collaborative poems on the topic.

In 2014, I built on our prior learning to personalize the idea of dignity. A post I penned four years ago called “Reclaiming Storytelling” describes the work done to address both the overarching question “Do teens really have to care about dignity and tolerance? and the idea that digital storytelling may be a way for Anishnabek students to reconnect and learn about their cultural worldview and perspective.

With the publication of the Truth and Reconciliation Report in 2015, I embarked on a collaborative inquiry project with Jaclyn Calder called #craftreconciliation. Woven throughout this exploration of the report are the ideas of dignity: identity, tolerance, equity, racism, gratitude, self-worth, respect, and diversity. To answer the question, “What does reconciliation look like?”, students needed to unpack not only what it meant for others to reconcile, but what it meant for them to receive reconciliation. In other words, how could they think about reconciliation as an act of reciprocity? Is this an appropriate question? What other approaches might be meaningful?

These broad themes also shaped the work in my grade 9 class.

Reinventing Room 121 blog post from February 2015

So why “dignity” this year?

I have had a beleaguered year and in an effort to right the ship, my work with students shifted from an explicit discussion of dignity to that of gratitude. Upon finishing Alan Gratz’s Refugee, I launched my classes into a #12DaysofGratitude event. Each day students considered a pre-set prompt on an aspect of gratitude. I opened each conversation with references to the novel and then wrote my own gratitude tweet in front of them. The last prompt asked students to consider, “What do you wish for in 2019?”

So as I headed into the winter break, I had a number of obvious choices for #onewordont: gratitude, notice, note, attentive, observe. And yet, I hesitated. As each day passed, I remained noncommittal.

I ran different ideas past my husband. Then my daughter.

I talked to my 4 month-old puppies.

Eliot (named after George Eliot) and Socrates (named after..Socrates)

What about perseverance? Or persist? Or health? Or conversation?

I really wasn’t getting anywhere. In frustration, I put the whole endeavour aside and dove into the festive season. A diffuse learning approach is what I needed. Do a bit of baking and cooking. Play some cards. Tell some stories. Catch up on favourite podcasts.

On the morning of December 29, I listened to Seth.

And discovered, or rediscovered dignity, that it encompasses acceptance, gratitude, equity, respect, trust, forgiveness, and the idea of noticing or to see.

In Refugee, my students and I were repeatedly confronted with the power of being seen or not seen. In the end, being seen saved the day. The realization and recognition of our shared humanity make the world a better place.

Ultimately, I am compelled by Seth’s notion that

when we see each other, when we grant each other dignity, instead of stripping it away, we become more human.

This is what we need today, the opportunity to see and be seen so that we create a real opportunity for reciprocity in our personal and our public lives.

The alternative is soul-crushing.

2 Comments

Filed under Year End Reflection

A New Way of Reading

This book- Reader Come Home – will be the next professional book I read. I went looking for a review after reading a series of tweets by Heidi Siwak and Matthew Oldridge about Wolf’s book and found this one by Jo Facer who provides a compelling review.

Reading all the Books

I knew I had to read this book when I heard Doug Lemov endorsing it. Reader, Come Homesells itself as a portrayal of the reading state of the nation. It is really about the state of humanity.

The author points out that the Ancient Greeks were concerned that rising literacy would fundamentally change people’s ability to remember, and that they weren’t wrong: the rise of reading did change the way our brains worked, making memory weaker, and remarkably rapidly. So today, with the rise in digital devices, both the way we read and the way our minds work has shifted. But are we worried about the right things this time? Our fears seem centred around the fact that more children (and adults, truth be told) are not reading… But they are.

In fact, we are reading more than ever before: the author quotes studies that reveal we are reading…

View original post 638 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Teaching

Why take on the #oneword challenge?

There are many reasons why one would take on this challenge, but for most, it comes down to focus and intentionality. Having one word through which to “see” your practice, to guide your work, and to reflect on your professional learning gives you a chance to be really intentional about your professional growth. Having one word to concentrate on allows you the time to delve into the nuances of the word, to look at it from various angles, to hold it close and then to view it from a distance. Having one word gives you the chance to be shaped by it.

Scroll through our Twitter hashtag #onewordOnt to read the vibrant and supportive conversation in this community.

Read a few of the #onewordOnt 2018 posts found on the community G+ site:

Finally, to ensure that I don’t miss your word, please check this document before January 18th.  If your word is missing, let me know via Twitter or in the comments below.

I am so eager to see our 2019 list!

Context:The #OneWordONT project began in 2015 with #OSSEMOOC (Ontario School and System Leaders Edtech MOOC – OSAPAC’s community of leaders learning how technology can change practice in education). By 2017, the Ontario Ministry of Education cut funding for OSSEMOOC, but I decided to continue the project since I believe that it helps build community and it offers a personal, non-threatening entry point to Twitter specifically and to a PLN generally

1 Comment

Filed under Teaching

Building Baby’s Library: Who am I?

90bc3-pb2b102bfor2b102b015

I’ve begun building a library for grandchildren. What a joy it is to peruse the shelves of books aimed at babies and toddlers! It’s been a long time since I spent time in that part of the bookstore and there are so many new treasures there. But, as I review the titles already in baby’s library, I realize that there is little diversity on that shelf.

Here is baby’s library so far (author then illustrator):

  1. Aston, Dianna and Sylvia Long. An Egg is Quiet.
  2. Carle, Eric. Little Cloud.
  3. Cassino, Mark, Jon Nelson and Nora Aoyagi. The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter’s Wonder.
  4. Covello, Paul. Canada ABC.
  5. Crozier, Lauren and Rachelle Anne Miller. More than Balloons.
  6. Day, Alexandra. Good Dog Carl.
  7. Daywalt, Drew and Oliver Jeffers. The Crayons’ Book of Colors.
  8. De la Pena, Matt and Loren Long. Love.
  9. Dean, James. Pete the Cat: Old MacDonald had a farm.
  10. Eastman, P.D. Are you my Mother?
  11. Falconer, Ian. Olivia.
  12. Fox, Meme and Steve Jenkins. Hello Baby!
  13. Glaser, Linda and Loretta Krupinski. Wonderful Worms.
  14. Gliori, Debi, No Matter What.
  15. Holub, Joan and James Dean. Mighty Dads.
  16. Jeffers, Oliver. A Little Stuck.
  17. Jeffers, Oliver. Up and Down.
  18. Jenkins, Steve. Biggest, Strongest, Fastest.
  19. Knapp, Andrew. Let’s find Momo!
  20. Landen, Nina. Peek-a-Choo-Choo!
  21. Landen, Nina. Peek-a-Who?
  22. Landen, Nina. Peek-a-Zoo.
  23. Lee, Dennis and Frank Newfeld. Alligator Pie.
  24. Levenson, George and Shmuel Thaler. Circle: The Story of a Garden.
  25. Light, Steve. Cars Go.
  26. Lomp, Stephen and Amy Pixton. Things that Go!
  27. Martin, Bill and Eric Carle. Brown Bear, Brown Bear What do you see?
  28. Messner, Kate and Christopher Silas Neil. Over and Under the Snow.
  29. Snyder, Betsy. I can Dance!
  30. Thiele, Bob, George David Weiss and Tim Hopgood. What a Wonderful World.
  31. Tudor, Tasha. 1 is One.

In selecting titles for the library, I have focused on fiction and nonfiction classics, and those books that my own children loved. I paid attention to nationality so that Canadian authors and illustrators might be included. It’s important that our children and grandchildren’s lives be reflected in words and pictures of the books they read. It’s also important that our children and grandchildren experience the world from the many diverse perspectives that make up our country. And yet, despite holding this belief, I hadn’t done the work to ensure that the library includes those voices.

So here’s the plan.

The focus for this year’s selections is on Canada. And within those titles I hope to have captures some of the diversity of this nation in content, but also in author and illustrator. Future lists (for #NF10for10 in February and then #PB10for10 in 2019 and so on) will take the grandchildren on global adventures.

Here’s my #PB10for10 list for 2018:

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.25.16 AM

The most iconic song ever written for the game of hockey comes to life through one of the greatest shinny games imaginable, illustrated by Governor General’s Award-winning artist and cartoonist Gary Clement.

As Stompin’ Tom Connors says, “It’s the good old hockey game, the best game you can name.” And in this charmingly illustrated book for all ages, the classic song played at hockey games around the world is imagined as a shinny game on an outdoor rink in the middle of the city that starts with two players and soon grows to include the whole community. Clement’s colorful illustrations unite young and old, men and women, and girls and boys of all races, all wearing fan paraphernalia from every team you can imagine. “The puck is in! The hometown wins! The good ol’ hockey game.”

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.25.32 AM

In the days of Roch’s childhood, winters in the village of Ste. Justine were long. Life centered around school, church, and the hockey rink, and every boy’s hero was Montreal Canadiens hockey legend Maurice Richard. Everyone wore Richard’s number 9. They laced their skates like Richard. They even wore their hair like Richard. When Roch outgrows his cherished Canadiens sweater, his mother writes away for a new one. Much to Roch’s horror, he is sent the blue and white sweater of the rival Toronto Maple Leafs, dreaded and hated foes to his beloved team. How can Roch face the other kids at the rink?

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.20.08 AM

“Dream a little, Kulu, this world now sings a most beautiful song of you.”

This beautiful bedtime poem, written by acclaimed Inuit throat singer Celina Kalluk, describes the gifts given to a newborn baby by all the animals of the Arctic.

Lyrically and tenderly told by a mother speaking to her own little Kulu; an Inuktitut term of endearment often bestowed upon babies and young children, this visually stunning book is infused with the traditional Inuit values of love and respect for the land and its animal inhabitants.

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.21.38 AM

“There once was a bear, a moose and a beaver who were the best of friends, though they often disagreed.” So when the three friends go canoeing together one sunny day, it doesn’t take long for them to start quarrelling with one another. First, they can’t decide who should get to steer the canoe. Later, they debate how best to get across a beaver dam that blocks their way. But when they can’t agree on the proper course for maneuvering through the white-water rapids they suddenly find themselves in, the consequences become truly perilous. It takes a long, uncomfortable night spent stranded on a rock to remind the bear, the moose and the beaver what they often forget: everything turns out better when they work together as a team.

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.21.12 AM

Ada hates everything about ballet class, yet she still has to go! Arabesques? Grotesque! And then one Saturday, Ada pliés right out the door and into the hallway, smacking into someone who thinks her ungraceful moves are great!

In the tradition of Kevin Henkes’s Lilly books and Russell and Lillian Hoban’s Frances classics, Ada is a plucky little kid with her own way of thinking. Through Ada’s stubbornness and emotional honesty, author/illustrator Elise Gravel shows her understanding of how kids feel and why. She shows us that anger is normal and feeling our emotions leads to growth! 

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.20.42 AM

What could be more perfect than a brand new set of crayons? Evan can’t wait to use them, until Snap!, the brown one breaks in two. Then one by one, the others break, get crushed, are blown away, or simply disappear. How can he possibly draw when there’s no green, purple, or even black?

Evan feels like throwing things, but instead, he scribbles using all the bits and pieces that are left. But what’s this? Where yellow and blue cross, there’s green, and when blue and red get all mixed up, it creates just the right purple to draw monsters. Soon, all he’s left with are tiny stubs of red, yellow, and blue, but Evan discovers that even with just a few crayons, he can create new and exciting art¬—his imagination is the only tool he needs.

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.22.53 AM

Chester is more than a picture book. It is a story told, and retold, by duelling author-illustrators. Melanie Watt starts out with the story of a mouse in a house. Then Melanie’s cat, Chester, sends the mouse packing and proceeds to cover the pages with rewrites from his red marker, and the gloves are off. Melanie and her mouse won’t take Chester’s antics lying down. And Chester is obviously a creative powerhouse with confidence to spare. Where will this war of the picture-book makers lead? Is it a one-way ticket to Chesterville, or will Melanie get her mouse production off the ground?

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.48.33 AM

When Jake finally gets a puppy to call his own, all he can think about is the fast, strong sled dog that his puppy will become. But Kamik is far from an obedient sled dog. He won’t listen, he tracks mud all over the house, and he’s a lot more work than Jake ever thought a puppy could be! But after a visit with his grandfather, who raised many puppies of his own while living out on the land, Jake learns that Inuit have been raising puppies just like Kamik to be obedient, resourceful, helpful sled dogs for generations.
Inspired by the real-life recollections of an elder from Arviat, Nunavut, this book lovingly recreates the traditional dog-rearing practices that prevailed when Inuit relied on dogs for transportation and survival.

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.23.23 AM

An evocative story about two brothers who are growing up (one faster than the other), an unusual summer night and a special tree house that proves childhood is not just a time but also a place. This story is so beautifully told that you may be compelled to build your own!

Screen Shot 2018-08-13 at 4.24.24 AM

Inspired by the childhood of real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield and brought to life by Terry and Eric Fan’s lush, evocative illustrations, The Darkest Dark will encourage readers to dream the impossible. 

Chris loves rockets and planets and pretending he’s a brave astronaut, exploring the universe. Only one problem–at night, Chris doesn’t feel so brave. He’s afraid of the dark. 
But when he watches the groundbreaking moon landing on TV, he realizes that space is the darkest dark there is–and the dark is beautiful and exciting, especially when you have big dreams to keep you company.

Happy Reading!!

Notes: I am super late with this post, but sometimes life interferes with our best intentions. See you in February for #NF10for10. To know more about  #PB10for10 information read this post by Cathy Mere.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under #pb10for10

Being the Change: A Cautionary Tale

2002553809_bde111dcc4_b

One of the challenges of writing a book (and teaching) about difficult topics like social comprehension is the content you need to use to demonstrate your ideas. Presumably, you want to include a breadth of examples so that a wide array of readers (learners) will connect with the ideas presented. I would argue that using a variety of examples provides us with the opportunity to illustrate varying ways of talking about the issues. This just makes sense. And there is no shortage of marginalized groups to access. Some of the more prominent groups include people from the following communities: LGBTQ, same-sex family, #metoo, Muslim, refugee, immigrant, People of Colour, working poor, and Indigenous peoples.

And yet, two of the 10 lessons in Being the Change are focused on Indigenous peoples. More importantly, not one other group is singled out in another lesson that demonstrates the negative way it’s treated in society.

Sure, Ahmed talks through her own lens (Muslim) when addressing students. In “Refusing to Let Others’ Biases Define Us”, Ahmed creates an ‘I am’ statement about being the daughter of Indian Muslim immigrants and she tells the students, “This one is not always easy for me to say because it is connected to negative stereotypes about Muslims, but I wanted to share one I feel proud of even though it is hard to share with total confidence” (63).  This makes sense, too. Because I am a white woman, I talk through my experiences fighting for equality. We do need to draw on who we are and what our experiences are to show our personal connection and commitment to the work of social comprehension.

Ahmed also includes student responses to the tough conversations that are the bedrock of social comprehension. “Listening with Love” opens with the story of Christine who painfully recalls ‘some of the labels she’s heard applied to herself and to her Mexican-American family: taco eaters, lazy spics, wet-backs, illegals’ (30). And in the forward, we see how student thinking has changed around the question “What makes a family?” to include same-sex families. Ahmed even includes an anecdote by someone beyond her classroom about a refugee family that depicts the ongoing work of social comprehension to open chapter 5 “Finding Humanity in Ourselves and n Others”.  Again, I think including these anecdotes and responses is appropriate. Ahmed needs to build in these stories to illustrate her ideas. We want to know how her students react to the lessons in the book. What does it really look like?

But no other group is made the centre of a lesson. Why not?

Let’s consider the two lessons in question. In “Understanding Microaggressions”, the content for the lesson is the poem “Sure You Can Ask Me A Personal Question” by Diane Burns.

Sure You Can Ask Me A Personal Question
How do you do?
No, I am not Chinese.
No, not Spanish.
No, I am American Indian, Native American.

No, not from India.
No, not Apache
No, not Navajo.
No, not Sioux.
No, we are not extinct.
Yes, Indian.

Oh?
So that’s where you got those high cheekbones.
Your great grandmother, huh?
An Indian Princess, huh?
Hair down to there?
Let me guess. Cherokee?

Oh, so you’ve had an Indian friend?
That close?

Oh, so you’ve had an Indian lover?
That tight?

Oh, so you’ve had an Indian servant?
That much?

Yeah, it was awful what you guys did to us.
It’s real decent of you to apologize.
No, I don’t know where you can get peyote.
No, I don’t know where you can get Navajo rugs real cheap.
No, I didn’t make this. I bought it at Bloomingdales.

Thank you. I like your hair too.
I don’t know if anyone knows whether or not Cher
is really Indian.
No, I didn’t make it rain tonight.

Yeah. Uh-huh. Spirituality.
Uh-huh. Yeah. Spirituality. Uh-huh. Mother
Earth. Yeah. Uh-huh. Uh-huh. Spirituality.

No, I didn’t major in archery.
Yeah, a lot of us drink too much.
Some of us can’t drink enough.

This ain’t no stoic look.
This is my face.

I love the lesson. In my initial reading of this chapter, I didn’t question the content choice. Indigenous peoples are often still marginalized in our societies (yours and mine). They are on the receiving end of microaggressions (as well as explicit racism), and Burns captures many of them in her poem. I wouldn’t use this poem to introduce the concept of microaggression to my First Nations students, but I would use the poem later in the lesson as a way for them to personally reflect on their own experiences with similar microaggressions. Frankly, my students are likely to find much humour in this poem.

In “Understanding Others’ Perspectives”, Ahmed chose again to focus the lesson on Indigenous content: the Chief Wahoo logo of the Cleveland Indians. And again I have no issue with the activities of the lesson, although I wouldn’t use that content to teach the “Intent vs Impact” lesson. I typically use a PSA like the one below with similar activities that Ahmed describes in this chapter because we are after all attempting to understand others’ perspectives.

So what’s the problem?

When we design lessons that centre on one group and the challenges it faces in the world, we may be contributing to the creation of a single story about that group because we, as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in her famous TedTalk “The Danger of a Single Story” says, ‘show a people as one thing, as only one thing, over and over again, and that is what they become’.

What about Indigenous identities do students learn from these two lessons?

The problem is that Ahmed has provided her reader’s with two lessons that add to the story of Indigenous peoples as marginalized, misunderstood, and invisible. It’s the emphasis that troubles me. I wished she could have used a variety of communities to illustrate how we can learn about the identities of others so that our social comprehension (how we make meaning from and mediate our relationship with the world) could expand and in doing so, demonstrate to us the breadth and depth of the work of decentering “the dominant normative narratives in society” (xxix).

The other problem is with the lack of Indigenous texts offered in Being the Change. In the “Suggested Resource Stacks”, Ahmed offers up potential titles to support teachers in their work in teaching social comprehension. Only one title listed is written by a self-identified Indigenous author:  Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie. But it’s not just the lack of titles offered that’s disappointing; it’s also that this author and this title are particularly problematic.

Because Indigenous peoples have for so long been misrepresented in literature, and because as educators we don’t want to perpetuate the misrepresentation (microaggressions), it behooves us to ensure that the texts we choose to use in our teaching are free of any misrepresentations. An excellent source to learn about potential Indigenous titles is American Indians in Children’s Literature created by Debbie Reese. “Established in 2006, American Indians in Children’s Literature (AICL) provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children’s and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society.”

Reese reviewed Thunder Boy Jr. when it was first published in 2016. Overall, she gave it a mixed review because the book, in its own way, contributes to the single story. The review is worth a read because her analysis is rich (you’ll learn a lot from her), but here is one of her key points:

By not being tribally specific, [Alexie’s] story obscures the diversity that Native writers, scholars, activists, parents, teachers, librarians, lawyers… have been bringing forth forever. We aren’t monolithic. We’re very different in our histories, religions, material cultures, and yes, the ways that we give names. Moving into that name play collapses significant distinctions across our nations.

Maybe the book is fine to use as an introduction to a unit on Indigenous peoples because it’s not specific and could lead the class into a discussion about the diversity of Indigenous peoples. But when we are actually teaching for diversity, away from the single story, towards the messiness of social comprehension, Thunder Boy Jr. might not be such a good choice.

A second reason that this book is not a good choice centres on ethical decision-making. Reese re-visited this book, and all of Sherman Alexie’s work, in February 2018 after news broke about the sexual harassment allegations made against Alexie. In an “Open Letter about Sherman Alexie” on February 25, 2018, Reese wrote:

Based on private conversations I have had, I can no longer let [Sherman Alexie’s] work sit on AICL without noting that he has hurt other Native writers in overt and subtle ways, including abuse, threats, and humiliation.

This then is the cautionary tale.

Let us work really hard to ensure that we are not promoting a single story –for anyone. Diversify your lessons to include lots of voices and identities.

And let us work really hard to ensure that the texts we use with students are the best that there are. Don’t take shortcuts. Investigate.

Finally, I would like to introduce you to a few Anishinabe people from Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory whose stories will help layer at least one Indigenous story. They are artists, designers, activists, researchers, and knowledge keepers.

7 Comments

Filed under #CyberPD

Five Things I Wish I knew When I started Teaching

In 2016, Dylan Wiliam wrote about the 9 Things Every Teacher Should Know. There is some overlap between Wiliam’s list and Hendrick’s, but mostly they compliment each other.

https://www.tes.com/news/dylan-wiliam-nine-things-every-teacher-should-know

chronotope

Carl Hendrick

1. Motivation doesn’t always lead to achievement, but achievement often leads to motivation.

While there is a strong correlation between self perception and achievement and we tend to think of it in that order, the actual effect of achievement on self perception is stronger than the other way round (Guay, Marsh and Boivin, 2003.) It may well be the case that using time and resources to improve student academic achievement directly may well be a better agent of psychological change than psychological interventions themselves. Daniel Muijs and David Reynolds (2011) note that:

At the end of the day, the research reviewed shows that the effect of achievement on self-concept is stronger that the effect of self-concept on achievement.

Despite this, a lot of interventions in education seem to have the causal arrow pointed the wrong way round. Motivational posters and talks are often a waste of time and may well give students a deluded…

View original post 1,141 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Teaching